KM on a dollar a day

Musing on knowledge management, aid and development with limited resources

Organizational lessons from youth advocates

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UN Live United Nations Web TV     New York Activate Talk  Innovative Approaches to Advocate for Child Rights

A couple of days ago I listened to an interesting webcast organized by UNICEF in its “Activate” series of talks – in this case on innovative approaches to advocate for child rights.

In a refreshing style, rather than asking some seasoned experts on how to advocate on youth issues they asked actual successful youth advocates themselves.

The speakers all had interesting and inspiring stories to tell about their own advocacy projects which carry a lot of useful insights for other would-be youth advocates and the organizations that seek to work with them and to support them.

But what struck me most as a person working on knowledge sharing, with a side interest in transforming the UN, was how relevant some of the key ideas were to our continual discussions on how to improve development organizations themselves.

A few relevant take-aways:

1. Not being afraid of failure. One of the speakers Erik Martin (@Eriklaes) spoke about how education often discourages failure but should instead encourage children to experiment and take risks and how it is important to have a safe space to fail in order to learn. But this too is a challenge for aid organizations where the pressure is to deliver consistently, but not to risk failure in order to achieve greater gains.

2. The need listening to and engaging with the people you wish to influence or to advocate for in order to better understand their needs and constraints, and to involve them in producing solutions that will be relevant and effective for them. This is a good practice for all parts of aid work not only youth advocacy, and something that aid agencies need to do more systematically. But this lesson also applies to internal organizational issues – when you are making strategic plans or carrying out organizational restructuring, or pondering about the future of the organization in the post-2015 world, it also makes sense to listen to and engage the staff of the organization who are the ones who will be expected to make these changes happen – but too often the engagement is only superficial.

3. The importance of building networks of people for mutual support as well as to work together and share their insights and experience, particularly across different locations or groups of people. Just as international youth networks can be stronger through the creation of large diverse networks of supporters, similarly for professional aid workers there is a lot of benefit to having strong networks of peer professionals with whom to share ideas, get advice and provide mutual support – and yet often this is left to  individuals when it is in an organization’s interest to support and strengthen these networks to help their staff be more effective. An important element that came up in the discussion was the benefit of bringing a diverse group of people together from different backgrounds and expertise in order to generate innovative ideas. Subject matter silos which stifle new ideas are also a well-known phenomenon in organizational culture and finding ways to create cross-sectoral networks and connections is also something we need to pursue.

In this blog I’m just picking up on those points that were particularly resonant for organizational change and knowledge sharing, but there were a lot of other interesting points on youth engagement and advocacy so if this interests you I’d recommend the whole webcast which is available on UNICEF’s Activate talks site here, and on the UN webcast site here.

Written by Ian Thorpe

June 13, 2014 at 10:01 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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  1. […] A couple of days ago I listened to an interesting webcast organized by UNICEF in its “Activate” series of talks – in this case on innovative approaches to advocate for child ri…  […]


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